Posts Tagged ‘kobe bryant’

By Brent Pella

A look at a few trending topics in the NBA community as the lockout season continues through winter:

“Good Lo’dy wo’dy / I just took more shots than Kobe”

Big Sean didn’t need to search too far to find a metaphor with the word ‘shot’ involved.

Kobe Bryant’s shooting habits are one of the most talked about caveats of the Lakers squad this season. Bryant has taken 292 shots through 12 games so far this season, and averages a Jordanesque 24.3 attempts per game. People continue to bash his shooting, while others say it’s the only way L.A. can score.

Fortunately for this argument, numbers don’t lie.

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By Brent Pella

“KO-BE…KO-BE…KO-BE…”

 

750 kids age 7-17 surround the basketball court at UCSB’s Thunderdome Event Center.

 

“KO-BE…KO-BE…KO-BE…”

 

Nearly 300 parents, onlookers and observers sit in the upper deck bleachers, patiently waiting with cameras ready.

 

“KO-BE…KO-BE…KO-BE…”

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By Dylan Davis

 

I was surfing the worldwide interwebs the other day when I came across this article by Joe Posnanski. In it, Posnanski lays out 14 baseball stats that mean nothing in the larger scheme of things, but are interesting nuggets of information when laid out by themselves. For example, did you know that Aubrey Huff has more career doubles than Mickey Mantle does? That’s not to say that Aubrey Huff is a better player than Mick is, (he certainly is not) but his hitting style just happens to produce more doubles than Mantle. That was interesting, but the stat that caught my eye for a number of reasons had to do with Johnny Damon.

 

Damon has amassed 2,662 hits over his 17-year career, while Ted Williams only piled up 2,654. Now, Williams has batted over 1,500 fewer times than Damon over his career (he was sent off to war twice and didn’t have Damon’s incredible streak of 16 straight seasons with 140 games played) and by almost any other stat (batting average, on base percentage, slugging percentage, etc…) Williams is far superior baseball player. While we all know that Williams is one of the greatest pure hitters to ever grace a baseball diamond, my thoughts immediately shifted to Damon’s career. As I quickly perused Damon’s career stats (2,662 hits, 224 HR’s, 1,088 RBI, and almost 400 steals) I quickly came to the uneducated opinion that Johnny Damon is a Hall of Famer. Now, that sentence may look ridiculous because, let’s be honest, Damon is more well known for looking like Jesus on the 2004 Red Sox than he is for his incredible baseball career

 

As I thought about it some more, I came to realize that the reason why it seemed so preposterous for Damon to be a Hall of Famer is because I have never heard a single baseball pundit even mention the possibility of Damon in the Hall of Fame. Sure, Derek Jeter, Ichiro Suzuki, Albert Pujols, and Alex Rodriguez (minus the steroid allegations and centaur pictures) all have gaudier numbers than Damon, but that doesn’t exclude Damon from being a Hall of Famer himself. Like it or not, a majority of the day-to-day sports information that we get is twisted in some way by the media. Sure, you can look at box scores until you’re blue in the face if you want 100% unbiased information, but most people want to go deeper than that. Looking at purely stats led me to believe that Johnny Damon is a potential Hall of Famer, but a player’s legacy is more shaped by the media nowadays than ever before. In fact, let’s look at the ways media shapes the way we view sports today.

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By Dylan Jamaal Davis

Let’s travel back to June 25th, 1997. On this date, the San Antonio Spurs had the first overall pick in the NBA Draft and used that selection on Wake Forest big man Tim Duncan. Duncan was the reigning college player of the year and one of the best prospects of the decade to join the professional ranks. As a member of the Spurs, he joined future hall of famer David Robinson in a loaded frontcourt that looked poised to bring multiple NBA championships to the Alamo City.

 

The Twin Towers brought a championship almost immediately following the strike shortened 1999 season. Robinson was reaching the tail end of his storied career, but with smart drafting and a patient front office, the Spurs were able to add point guard Tony Parker in 2001 and shooting guard Manu Ginobili for the 2002 season. Alongside Duncan, Parker and Ginobili were able to capture NBA crowns in 2003, 2005, and 2007. Duncan fostered a defense-first, unselfish mentality that was embraced by the entire Spurs organization as they dominated for over a decade. Two thousand eleven was seen as the final hurrah for the Spurs as the core three had all moved past their prime and been robbed of much of their athleticism. Left with only their basketball IQ’s and a few promising role players, the Spurs grabbed the number one seed in the Western Conference playoffs and looked poised for a long playoff run.

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